LIFE AS A THERAPIST

At DHC we aim to provide quality healthcare in local setting for the benefit of patients.

Counselling

Discover more about Counselling

What is counselling?

People seek counselling to help them resolve emotional, psychological and relationship issues. They may be experiencing difficult and distressing events in their lives, such as bereavement, divorce, health issues or job concerns. Or they may have more general, underlying feelings of anxiety and dissatisfaction with life. Some clients feel isolated and have no one else to talk to, but even people with supportive family and friends can find it difficult to talk to them about feeling anxious or depressed. Or they may just find it easier to talk about personal, family or relationship issues with an independent and professional therapist.

What happens in counselling?

There will be a series of formal sessions, usually up to 6, in which the counsellor and client talk about the client’s issues and feelings. This might include life events, feelings, emotions relationships; ways of thinking or patterns of behaviour. The counsellor will listen, encourage and empathise but will also challenge to help the client see their issues more clearly or in a different way. Counselling is not about giving advice or opinions, nor is it a friendly chat with a friend. The counsellor helps the client to understand themselves better and find their own solutions to resolve or cope with a problem.

Counselling can be helpful if you are

  • feeling painful emotions
  • facing difficult decisions
  • wanting to improve or change relationships
  • helping to develop a better understanding of yourself or others

And especially if:

  • Something particularly unsettling has happened, such as bereavement, a redundancy or a change of relationship.
  • There has been something that has happened in the past that has not been dealt with and is now interfering with daily life. This might be the death or illness of an important person in your life, or may be something that happened over a long period, such as being bullied or abused in childhood (and beyond).
  • and if help offered by friends and family is not enough, or not available.

Inclusion/Exclusion factors for therapists:

Client Presentation

Depression: Mild to severe on PHQ9

Counselling?

Counselling/CFD

Anxiety Presentations: Mild to severe on GAD7

If part of presentation

PTSD

EMDR/CBT = key intervention (see below)

Self-Harm

As per service criteria/client preference

Eating Disorders

As per service criteria/client preference

Relationship issues

Yes (Couples counselling coming soon)

Family issues

Yes

Redundancy/financial/housing issues

S2 practical support/signposting 
Counselling to follow if appropriate

Develop better understanding of self: “Who am I”

Yes

Understand and explore emotional problems

Yes

Facing difficult decisions

Yes

Low self esteem

Yes

Past issues that has not been dealt with and now interfering with daily life

Yes

Domestic Abuse

Yes
subject to service criteria
Signpost specialist agencies

Sexual Abuse

Yes
subject to service criteria 
Signpost specialist agencies

Rape

Yes
subject to service criteria
Signpost specialist agencies

Bullying (historical/current)

Yes

Bereavement

Yes
subject to service criteria
Signpost specialist agencies

Cultural Issues

Client preference

LGBT Issues

Client preference

Gender Issues

Client preference

PTSD:
According to NICE guidelines (see below), we can offer counselling for single issue PTSD to those who prefer the approach, but making it very clear at the outset that there is no convincing clinical evidence for significant outcome/recovery.

Do not routinely offer non-trauma- focused interventions (such as relaxation or non-directive therapy) that do not address traumatic memories. For people with PTSD with no or limited improvement after a specific trauma-focused psychological treatment, consider: an alternative form of trauma-focused psychological treatment pharmacological treatment in addition to trauma-focused psychological treatment. If people with PTSD request other forms of psychological treatment (for example supportive therapy, non-directive therapy,
hypnotherapy, psychodynamic therapy or systemic psychotherapy), inform them that there
is no convincing evidence for a clinically important effect.

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